The Morning Post

Andrew Lang wrote a column that appeared most Fridays in the Morning Post in 1905–1912, in addition to writing many signed book reviews for the paper.

Please scroll down for some full-text scans of Lang’s Morning Post columns (beginning July 1906, with some scans from 1907 and 1908). The tabulation below of Lang’s Friday columns is currently incomplete; I hope to return to the Bodleian or the British Library in the future to complete this work. I am grateful to both the Bodleian and the British Library for their permission to post readable, low-resolution scans of Lang’s columns on these pages. When you open the PDF, the initial page is a full-page scan, followed by three pages in which Andrew Lang’s column appears by itself.)

1905 (Spot check)

[Early dates in 1905 are only partially explored. Because I needed to get through a large number of microfilm slides in a limited time and could never see (and read) the entire page of news at once on the microfilm reader, users of this site should use caution and may wish to verify independently that no Lang column exists on days when I could not find one. I hope to be able to check the records more thoroughly on a future visit to the UK. Articles with BAL written after them were found in the Book of Andrew Lang, a scrapbook of Lang articles, unfortunately without page numbers, at the Special Collections at the University of St Andrews.]

“The Decay of Learning.” 5 May 1905, p. 8

“The Tribe of Wragge.” 12 May 1905, p. 8

“Brandes on Scott.” 19 May 1905, p. 8

“The Magic Mirror of Ink.” 26 May 1905, p. 8

2 June 1905. [? There may be a Lang column for this week. I did not find the column on pages 7–10 at a time when I did not realize that the editors occasionally placed Lang’s column earlier in the newspaper. Because I had not completed my search on other reels, I did not go back to check June 2.]

“The Theory and Practice of Faking.” 9 June 1905. p. 9

“Ailurophobia.” 16 June 1905, p. 4

“The Uses of Controversy.” 23 June 1905, p. 9

“History as a Compilation of Omissions,” 30 June 1905, p. 9

[Other 1905 columns are not yet catalogued.]

1906

“Heroes and Heroines.” 5 Jan. 1906, p. 9

“Playing to the Crowd.” 12 Jan. 1906, p. 9

“Book-Plates.” 9 Jan. 1906, p. 10

“The Great Whitewashed.” 26 Jan. 1906 p. 8

“Xenoglossy.” 2 Feb. 1906, p. 9

“Ligny and Waterloo.” 9 Feb. 1906, p. 9

“A Geneaological Puzzle” 16 Feb., 1906, p. 9

“Ballads Worth Reading.” 23 Feb. 1906, p. 9

???? 2 Mar, 1906, p. 9

“Bad English, Old and New.” 9 Mar. 1906, p. 9

“Horses as Forbidden Food.” 16 Mar. 1906, p. 9

“The Story of Lady Grange.” 23 Mar. 1906, p. 9

“The Bibliomania.” 30 Mar. 1906, p. 9

“Early Horses and Horsemen.” 6 Apr. 1906, p. 9

“Myths of Memory.” 13 Apr. 1906, p. 7

“The Purgatory of Honest Women.” 20 Apr. 1906, p. 7

“Byron in America.” 27 Apr. 1906, p. 9

“Grammar to the Wolves.” 4 May 1906, p. 9

“Cat’s Cradle.” 11 May, 1906, p. 9

“How Americans Take Tribulation.” [The San Francisco Earthquake] 18 May 1906, p. 9

“Broughton’s Saucer: A Sequel.” 25 May 1906, p. 9

“Mysteries in Fiction.” 1 Jun 1906, p. 9

“Angling Now and Then.” 8 Jun 1906, p. 9

“The Clothes of Ghosts.” 15 Jun 1906, p. 9

“A Futile Invasion,” 22 Jun 1906, p. 9

“Fiction and the Dead.” 29 Jun 1906, p. 9

“A Lost Chance for a Ballad.” 6 July 1906, p. 9

“The Glorious Uncertainty of Cricket.” 13 Jul 1906, p. 9

“Position of the Man of Letters.” 20 Jul 1906, p. 4

“Glorun and Oro.” 27 Jul 1906, p. 4

“History, Interesting or Unreadable.” 3 Aug. 1906, p. 8

“A Very Moral Critic.” 10 Aug 1906, p. 7

“Human Sacrifice.” 17 Aug 1906, p. 7

“The Laureate Novelist.” 24 Aug. 1906, p. 3

[Apparently none.] 31 Aug. 1906

“Mysteries of Culloden.” 7 Sep. 1906. p. 7

“The Simplification of Grammar.” 14 Sep. 1906, p. 7

“Ancestral Jokes.” 21 Sep. 1906, p. 7

“Aberdeen and Scottish Universities.” 28 Sep. 1906, p. 7

“Prefaces.” 5 Oct. 1906, p. 7 [BAL]

“The Mystery of Book Selling.” 12 Oct. 1906, p. 7 [BAL]

“Day Dream Writing.” [on automatic writing] 19 Oct. 1906, p. 7 [BAL]

“Telephany and Telethoryby.” 26 October 1906, p. 9 [BAL]

“Treasure and Tradition.” 2 Nov. 1906 [BAL]

“An Ill-Considered Murder.” 9 Nov. 1906 [BAL]

“Greek Minor Poetry.” 16 Nov. 1906.

The Aged Lion (23 Nov. 1906) [BAL]

“The Night Side of Shelley’s Nature.” 30 Nov. 1906. [BAL]

“A Victim of Macaulay.” 7 Dec. 1906 [BAL]

“The Origins of Heraldry.” 14 Dec. 1906. [BAL]

“Confessions of a Publisher.” 21 Dec. 1906 [BAL]

“Shelley’s First Novel.” 28 Dec. 1906. [BAL]

1907

[Jan 4 and 11 apparently nothing]

“How to Tell a Ghost Story.” 18 Jan 1907, p. 9. [BAL]

“Mrs. Oliphant succeeded twice or thrice, discovering a vein of poetry in her nature which is not conspicuous in her novels. In that astonishing and perennially neglected book “The Confessions of a Justified Sinner,” James Hogg, the Ettrick Shepherd, did by far the best “supenatural” fiction of his generation, with one exception. The book is far too long, and in the earlier parts, is heavily encombered with clumsy and antiquated humour. But, as the conlusion approaches, the narrative of Hogg’s frenzied, lost, and haunted Calavinist becomes a veritable masterpiece, and (with Scott’s unapproachable “Wandering Willie’s Tale,” in “Red Gauntlet”) is the direct ancestor of Mr. Stevenson’s gruesome “Thrawn Janet.” I do not think that Hogg’s book received any favourable notice when it first appeared; or that is recent reprint was more fortunate” (9)

“The Crusade Against Historical Novels.” 25 Jan. 1907, p. 9. [BAL]

“Poets and Poets.” 1 Feb. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“Restoration“ at Holyrood 8 Feb. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“The Real Minotaur.” 15 Feb. 1907 [BAL] p.9

Respectability Defended 22 Feb. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“The Survival of Witches.” 1 Mar. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“Mechanism and Criticism.” 8 Mar. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

The Legal Status of Ghosts 15 Mar. 1907 [BAL] p. 9

Trial by Combat 22 March 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“Books and their Prices” 29 Mar 1907, p. 7 [not in BAL]

The Romance of a Dispensation 5 April 1907 [BAL] p. 9

“Story-Transference” 12 April 1907 [BAL]

Society and Superstition. 19 April 1907 [BAL], p. 10

A Word for Professor Jowett 26 April 1907 [BAL], p. 9 [I also scanned April 15, p. 2 “Mrs. Sellar’s Recollections and Impressions”]

Whaur’s Geordie Byron Noo?” 3 May 1907 [BAL] p. 10 (The MP index is incorrect.)

The Mystery of Christabel 10 May 1907 (BAL]

“Names of Relationships.” 17 May 1907. p. 4

“Things that Puzzle a Plain Man.” 24 May 1907. p. 4

“The Lord Elcho of 1745.” 31 May 1907. p. 10

“A Late Forgotten Wit.” 7 Jun 1907, p. 4

“Reflections on the Old Cricketeers.” 14 Jun 1907, p. 9

“The Glen of Weeping.” 21 May 1907, p. 4

“The Irish Type of Fairy.” 28 Jun 1907, p. 10

“The American of the Future.” 5 Jul 1907, p. 10 [on immigration and assimilation]

“Why Novels are Read.” 12 Jul 1907. p. 9 [On Mr. Howells]

“Irishmen and Homer’s Men.” 19 Jul. 1907, p. 4 [Early Life in Ireland]

“The Sins of the Hypothesis.” 26 Jul 1907. p. 4 [John Stuart Mill]

“Rather Too Rich.” 2 Aug 1907, p. 9 [On Reviewing novels of early Christian times which are “all the same.”]

“Miracles and Evidence.” 9 Aug 1907, p. 2

“Roman Literary Men.” 16 Aug. 1907, p. 2

“Highland History.” 23 Aug. 1907, p. 8

“Ballads in America.” 30 Aug 1907, p. 8

“Edinburgh Appreciated.” 6 Sep 1907, p. 3

“The Growth of a Story.” 13 Sep 1907, p. 7

“Pope on Homer.” 20 Sep 1907, p. 7

“The Problem of Tragedy.” 27 Sep 1907, p. 7

“Concerning Our Illusions.” 4 Oct 1907, p. 2 [History vs. Pleasant Stories]

“The Mark of Cain.” 11 Oct 1907, p. 2 [On Frazer’s Folklore in the Old Testament]

“Salem Vindicated.” 18 Oct 1907, p. 2

“Old Owners of our Books.” 25 Oct. 1907, p. 2

“The Treasure Ship of Tobermory.” 1 Nov 1907, p. 2

“Signs Before Death.” 8 Nov 1907, p. 2

[Apparently none for 15 Nov. 1907]

“The Economics of a Golf Ball.” 22 Nov 1907, p. 9

“Ladies Loving and Luckless.” 29 Nov 1907, p. 4

“Professionals and Amateurs.” 6 Dec. 1907, p. 9 [on the accumulation of information]

“The Mystery of Old Iron.” 13 Dec. 1907, p. 9

“A Pattern to Pushers.” 20 Dec. 1907, p. 2

Dec. 27 [apparently none?]

 1908

“Macnaughton’s Revenge.” 3 Jan 1908, p. 3

“The Great American Moral Lesson.” 10 Jan 1908. p. 2

“Puzzles in Criticism.” 17 Jan. 1908, p. 9

“The Great Drood Case.” 24 Jan 1908, p. 9

“Me and My Governor.” 30 Jan 1908, p. 4 [A spoof on Edmund Gosse’s Father and Son.]

“Humour and Earnestness.” 7 Feb 1908, p. 9 [A response to people who took the previous column seriously]

“Waterloo by Telegraph.” 14 Feb 1908, p. 9

“Lord Acton’s Puzzle.” 21 Feb 1908, p. 4

“Jeanne d’Arc’s New Historian.” 28 Feb 1908, p. 9

“How to Write Novels.” 6 Mar 1908, p. 9

“The Madness of Socrates.” 13 Mar 1908, p. 9

“The Iniquity of Memorials.” 20 Mar 1908, p. 9

“The Rise of Ball Games.” 27 Mar 1908, p. 9

“A Judicial Puzzle.” 3 Apr. 1908, p. 4

“Grave Charges Against an Archbishop.” 10 Apr 1908, p. 4

“On Writing Oneself Out.” 17 Apr. 1908, p. 3

“The General Instructor.” 24 Apr. 1908, p. 4

“American Universities ‘Harking Back.’” 1 May 1908, p. 5

“Science and Superstition.” 8 May 1908. p. 10

“American Athletes.” 15 May, 1908, p. 10

“The Evolution of Bowling.” 22 May 1908, p. 9

“The Prehistoric Up to Date.” 29 May 1908, p. 9

“Shakespeare and Joan of Arc.” 5 Jun 1908, p. 10

“The Appearance of War.” 12 Jun 1908, p. 9

“The Wiles of the Medium.” 19 Jun 1908, p. 9

“Thoughts on Jewelry.” 26 Jun 1908, p. 10

“The Real Brigadier General.” 3 July 1908, p. 10

“Howlers.” 10 Jul 1908, p. 10

“Thoughts on Protective Resemblances.” 17 Jul 1908, p. 4

“Doubles.” 24 Jul 1908, p. 9

“The Possibilities of Glamour.” 31 Jul 1908, p. 9

“Rather Strange Stories.” 7 Aug. 1908, p. 7

“Touchiness about Names.” 14 Aug 1908, p. 7

“Unseens.” 21 Aug. 1908, p. 7

28 Aug. 1908 [Apparently none].

“Reminiscences of Mr. Hall Caine.” 4 Sep. 1908, p. 7

“‘A Nice Marality, Stap Me’.” 11 Sep 1908. p. 2

“Amateur Students of War.” 18 Sep 1908, p. 7

“The Greek Anthology.” 25 Sep 1908, p. 2

“The Strange Case of Lurancy Vennum.” 2 Oct 1908, p. 2

“The Bookman’s Character.” 9 Oct 1908. p. 7

“The Puzzle of Old Irish Romances.” 16 Oct 1908, p. 9

“Unearthly Experiments.” 23 Oct. 1908, p. 3

“‘Sympneumata’—and Orpheus” 30 Oct 1908, p. 7

“Luck Bringers.” 6 Nov. 1908, p. 8

“A Popular Fallacy.” 13 Nov. 1908, p. 3 [on Homer’s non-influence on English poetry]

“Waterloo Poetry.” 20 Nov. 1908, p. 4

“Possible and Impossible Historical Novels.” 27 Nov. 1908, p. 9

“The Man of the Mask.” 4 Dec. 1908, p. 9

“Agincourt.” 11 Dec. 1908, p. 4

“The Paltriest of Pretenders.” 18 Dec. 1908, p. 4

“The Philosophy of Antipathies.” 25 Dec. 1908, p. 7

 1909

[As yet uncatalogued]

1910

[As yet uncatalogued]

1911

[As yet uncatalogued]

1912

[Early months uncatalogued.]

“A Simple Seeress.” 3 May 1912, p. 13

“An Academic Broil.” 10 May 1912, p. 5

“The Making of a Seer.” 17 May 1912, p. 12

“A Literary Tragedy.” 24 May 1912, p. 10

“What Salmon See.” 31 May 1912, p. 10

“The Great Initiates.” 7 Jun 1912

“The Search for a Subject.” 14 Jun 1912

“Marbot and Truth.” 21 Jun 1912, p. 10

“An Old Waterloo Book.” 28 Jun 1912, p. 13

“The Mystery of Shakespeare’s Monuments.” 5 Jul 1912, p. 3

“From the Pavilion.” 12 Jul 1912, p. 10

“Problems Concerning Jeanne d’Arc” 19 Jul 1912. p. 5

Lang died on 20 July 1912. No more Friday columns were published, but the Morning Post did include posthumous material.

“Death of Mr. Andrew Lang.” Monday, 22 Jul 1912, p. 7

“The Late Mr. Andrew Lang: Funeral at St Andrews” Friday, 26 Jul 1912, p. 7

“The Heroic Age.” [Posthumous book review signed Andrew Lang.] Monday, 29 Jul 1912, p. 2

“Shakomania.” [Posthumous book review signed Andrew Lang.] Monday, 5 Aug 1912, p. 2

[I am missing at least one other posthumous review, which The Morning Post claims as the last piece Lang ever wrote. The beginning of this review [but not the whole of it] is available as a news clipping in “The Book of Andrew Lang,” ms38746 in the special collections at the University of St Andrews.  In an obituary in Oxford Magazine, George Saintsbury drew attention to the fact that many newspapers published Lang material in late July: Saintsbury wrote that Lang was “a gentleman of the Press for six-and-thirty years till his death, and in fact after it. For more than one newspaper hastened to inform the world that it had posthumous material, which in each case was probably his last composition—a circumstance which, it may be said with perfect certainty, could have amused no one more and disgusted no one less than himself” (The Oxford Magazine, vol. XXXI, No. 1, 17 Oct. 1912, p. 5)]

Return to the list of known periodicals to which Lang contributed.
Learn more about Lang’s contributions to The AuthorBlackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Folk-Lore, and Longman’s Magazine.